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  Alternate Universes

Smallville: Random "Redux" Musings

More musings, half a batch anyway. The Future of Fandom, the Distant Future of Fandom, and myself watched it, in two batches because we missed the swim scene the first time due to not having changed the time on the VCR.

1. The whole story line with Mr. Clark drove me *nuts*. I can only think, "this is what happens when men who are Real Guys write about family dynamics."

In a word: Grandma. Martha sees her dad for the first time in many years, and she doesn't say, "how's Mom?" Clark gives his grandpa pictures, he never mentions how Mr. Clark can show them to his grandmother. The men in the family aren't speaking to each other, and so Martha brings up her child without talking to her *mother*?!?

None of this makes any sense to me. None. I've thought about it and thought about it, and I can't come up with a spackle that fits any kind of human family dynamics. Even if Mrs. Clark is seriously disturbed, she would be mentioned in that painful let's-now-all-skirt-the-issue way.

2. Nonetheless, there was one element in this plotline I liked: showing how much of Jon's sense of himself as a man is bound up in, not just protecting his family, but providing for them. Taking money from anyone, even family, is deeply threatening to him. This doesn't make me think he's nice, exactly, but it makes him quite believable. I actually think TPTB (when they bother thinking) are trying to make Jonathan morally ambivalent this season, trying to make us love him and be completely exasperated with him at the same time. Kind of like the way you feel about you own parents, some days.

3. Could the CLex be any cuter? I thought not. The way Clark's eyes glide up and down Lex's body when they say goodbye at the school, mrrowr. And the way they both giggle at the idea of Lex's friendship being such a burden to Clark. Ooo, burden me some more, baybee.

4. I think Lex's notorious escapades at Excelsior must have involved sex with boys, though I think not with Reynolds' son, Lex's convos with him lacked that personal touch. But I think maybe Lex was starting to look up to Reynolds in a fatherly way (which is how it's supposed to work at that kind of boarding school), and Lionel ruined Reynolds' career as part of his "Pamela campaign" to cut Lex off from affectionate relationships.

Reynolds' coming down hard on Clark for "slacking" actually makes a bit of sense to me (if we follow TPTB's lead and, like, totally ignore the extracurricular activities he's done, like the blood drive and running for class president and working on a friggin' farm) if Clark's scores on standardized tests are *fantastic*. Good grades at a mediocre high school don't help all that much at getting into a top-flight college, but if he has near-perfect test scores (as Supes canon would predict) *and* combines them with interesting extra-currics he could go farther than any of the other students at the school, and I think that's what Reynolds is getting at. Though he also would have to cut loose from that no-good slimy boyfriend . . .

5. Future of Fandom wonders if "Excelsior" is really Lionel's old school, Future Maniacal Villains in Suits Prep. Where Draco should have gone, to learn how to pick better minions. Where Pegasus (of Yu-Gi-Oh) clearly went, though his fashion sense got stuck in 1976.

6. They can show the guys swimming any time. No problem. Strip 'em down and get 'em wet is our motto. Though the lack of Speedos or other actual swim-racing suits was a real disappointment -- no-one wears floppy trunks for competitive swimming anymore.

I can't write more right now, FoF is on a class trip and the US election results, though good locally, on a national level have got me thinking about moving to Canada.

 

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by Mary Ellen, "Doctor Science, MA"

     

 


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updated January 4, 2003

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